FAQ

General FAQ

Do you have evening and weekend appointments?

All of our offices are open Monday through Saturday. We are open Monday through Thursday from 8am to 8pm. On Fridays, we are open from 8am to 5pm. On Saturday, all offices are open from 8am to 5pm.

Insurance

What types of insurance are accepted?

Our office accepts nearly all major insurance plans and we are a provider for Delta Dental, Anthem and Cigna. We will submit to most insurance companies and file your claim where appropriate, handle all the paperwork and help you get maximum insurance benefits.

Payment

What types of payment are accepted?

We accept cash, personal checks and most major credit cards.

Pediatric Dentistry

Does Dental Associates offer adult dental services too?

A. Yes. Dental Associates offers comprehensive dental services for the entire family at any of our four convenient locations.

Are dental sealants effective for my child?

A. Dental sealants have been a highly effective treatment for preventing tooth decay since 1967 and is recommended by our dentists.

Does my child need a fluoride treatment?

A. Children between 6 months and 16 may need a fluoride treatment. Your Pediatric Dentist can determine your child’s needs.

When is the right time for a Orthodontic checkup?

A. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends all children see a orthodontist by age 7.

What is the right age to bring my child in for a first visit?

A. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that all children schedule their first visit by their first birthday or when the first tooth appears.

Endodontic

What is the cost of Endodontic care?

The cost varies depending on how severe the problem is and which tooth is infected. Molars are more difficult to treat and usually cost more. Most dental insurance policies provide coverage for endodontics treatment. Endodontic treatment and restoration of the natural tooth are less expensive than the alternative of having the tooth extracted. An extracted tooth must be replaced with a bridge or implant to restore chewing function and prevent adjacent teeth from shifting. Endodontic Associates participates with most major dental insurance companies. Our staff will gladly work with you on various methods of paying for our services.

Who performs Endodontic treatment on dental patients?

All dentists receive some training in root canal treatment. When a dentist decides whether to treat a patient they should consider the following factors: level of knowledge, degree of expertise, the available technology, the challenges or risks present and the chance of success. Your family dentist may refer you to an endodontist because he or she believes that your case has the best chance to be successfully, efficiently and painlessly treated by an endodontist. Endodontists are dentists with advanced training in treating the diseased or damaged pulp, of your tooth. Endodontists spend at least two years after dental school, training to become endodontic specialists. In practice, they perform only endodontic procedures and therefore have extensive experience in this area. Many studies show a greater success rate from Doctors who have extensive experience, and perform the procedure daily for many patients.

What are some advantages of Endodontic Therapy

  • The presence and appearance of natural teeth is psychologically important.
  • It is important for patients to retain as many natural teeth as possible in sound condition. This places as little stress as possible on the adjacent teeth.
  • Teeth treated may be used in bridge construction.
  • Treatment may take place at any age.
  • Endodontic treatment results in fewer complications and less post-procedure pain than tooth extraction or implants.
  • Root canal treatment is generally less expensive than tooth extraction coupled with placement of a bridge or implants.

Can all teeth be treated Endodontically?

Most teeth can be treated. Occasionally, a tooth can’t be saved because the root canals are not accessible, the root is severely fractured, the tooth doesn’t have adequate bone support, or the tooth cannot be restored. Quite often when traditional endodontic treatment is not effective, endodontic surgery may be able to save the tooth.

What is the success rate ?

Although the pulp is removed, your tooth remains alive, nourished by surrounding tissues. Most endodontically treated teeth should last as long as any other permanent teeth you have, provided you are in good health and your body has the ability to repair the damaged bone.

Is root canal treatment painful?

Root canal treatment does not cause pain, it relieves it. Most patients see their dentist or endodontist when they have a severe toothache. The toothache can be caused by damaged tissues in the tooth. Root canal treatment removes this damaged tissue from the tooth, thereby relieving the pain you feel.

Invisalign

Does insurance cover Invisalign?

Any insurance plan that covers orthodontics will cover Invisalign.

Does Invisalign really work?

Yes. Invisalign has been proven effective at straightening teeth.

How much does Invisalign cost?

We understand that cost is always a concern, and our orthodontists will determine the price of treatment after examining your smile. It is typically in the same range as traditional metal braces and the cost depends on the complexity of the case and the estimated time of treatment.

How often will I have to wear my aligners?

Invisalign only works while you’re wearing the aligners. It’s recommended that you wear your aligners full-time, day and night, except to eat, brush, and floss your teeth.

Will wearing Invisalign aligners affect my speech?

Some people are affected more than others, but most adjust in a short period of time to the feeling of the aligners and do not have permanent changes in their speech.

Will the treatment be painful?

Each time you change to a new aligner, there may be some temporary discomfort while your teeth adjust to their new position. This is completely normal, and is a good sign that the treatment is working.

What do aligners look like?

Aligners are clear and nearly invisible. If you’ve ever seen clear tooth-whitening trays, that should give you a good idea of what the aligners look like. Invisalign aligners are custom-made to fit and move your teeth.

How does Invisalign work?

Our Invisalign-trained orthodontists at Dental Associates will utilize 3D computer imaging technology to demonstrate the complete treatment plan from the initial position to the final desired position. This imaging technology is then used to design an individualized series of custom-made aligners. The patient wears the aligner for about two weeks while the teeth move incrementally. After two weeks, the current aligner is replaced with the next one until the final position is achieved.

Periodontal Care
1)  Who is a periodontist? A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal disease, and in the placement of dental implants. Periodontists receive extensive training in these areas, including three additional years of education beyond dental school. They are familiar with the latest techniques for diagnosing and treating gum disease, and are also trained in performing cosmetic periodontal procedures. Periodontists offer a wide range of treatments, including surgical and non surgical techniques. In addition, periodontists are specially trained in the placement and repair of dental implants.

2)  What are the Types of Gum disease? Untreated periodontal disease can eventually lead to tooth loss and other health problems.

Gingivitis Gingivitis is the mildest form of periodontal disease. It causes the gums to become red, swollen, and bleed easily. There is usually little or no discomfort at this stage. Gingivitis is often caused by inadequate oral hygiene. Gingivitis is reversible with professional treatment and good oral home care. Factors that may contribute to gingivitis include, diabetes, smoking, aging, genetic predisposition, systemic diseases and conditions, stress, inadequate nutrition, puberty, hormonal fluctuations, pregnancy, substance abuse, HIV infection, and certain medication use. Periodontitis Untreated gingivitis can advance to periodontitis. With time, plaque can spread and grow below the gum line. Toxins produced by the bacteria in plaque irritate the gums. The toxins stimulate a chronic inflammatory response in which the body in essence turns on itself, and the tissues and bone that support the teeth are broken down and destroyed. Gums separate from the teeth, forming pockets (spaces between the teeth and gums) that become infected. As the disease progresses, the pockets deepen and more gum tissue and bone are destroyed. Often, this destructive process has very mild symptoms, most of the time painless.  Eventually, teeth can become loose and may have to be removed. NON INFLAMMATORY ISSUES Periodontal problems also include receded gums, bony defects resulting from extractions, gummy smile.    

What are Gum Disease Risk Factors? Who is at risk?

The main cause of periodontal (gum) disease is plaque (bacteria), but other factors affect the health of your gums.

Age

Studies indicate that older people have the highest rates of periodontal disease. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that over 70% of Americans 65 and older have periodontitis.

Smoking/Tobacco Use

Tobacco use is linked with many serious illnesses such as cancer, lung disease and heart disease, as well as numerous other health problems. Tobacco users also are at increased risk for periodontal disease. Studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease.

Genetics

Research has indicated that some people may be genetically susceptible to gum disease. Despite aggressive oral care habits, these people may be more likely to develop periodontal disease. Identifying these people with a genetic test before they even show signs of the disease and getting them into early intervention treatment may help them keep their teeth for a lifetime.

Stress

Stress is linked to many serious conditions such as hypertension, cancer, and numerous other health problems. Stress also is a risk factor for periodontal disease. Research demonstrates that stress can make it more difficult for the body to fight off infection, including periodontal diseases.

Medications

Some drugs, such as oral contraceptives, antidepressants, and certain heart medicines, can also affect your oral health.

Clenching or Grinding Your Teeth

Clenching or grinding your teeth can put excess force on the supporting tissues of the teeth and could speed up the rate at which these periodontal tissues are destroyed.

Other Systemic Diseases

Other systemic diseases that interfere with the body’s inflammatory system may worsen the condition of the gums. These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Poor Nutrition and Obesity

A diet low in important nutrients can compromise the body’s immune system and make it harder for the body to fight off infection. Because periodontal disease begins as an infection, poor nutrition can worsen the condition of your gums. In addition, research has shown that obesity may increase the risk of periodontal disease.  

What are the symptoms of Gum Disease?

Gum disease is often silent, meaning symptoms may not appear until an advanced stage of the disease. However, warning signs of gum disease may include one or more of the following:

  • Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth
  • Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or eating hard food
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look      longer than before
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Persistent bad breath
  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • A change in the fit of partial dentures

 

What are the treatments for Gum Disease?

Treatment of periodontal disease may include both non-surgical (deep cleanings) and surgical treatments, depending on how advanced your periodontal disease is and what is your periodontal problem.  Surgical procedures include: Gum Graft Surgery Laser frenectomy or gingivectomy Regenerative Procedures Dental Crown Lengthening Dental Implants Pocket Reduction Procedures Plastic Surgery Procedures     What Happens in Your Mouth Doesn’t Necessarily Stay in Your Mouth   Research has shown that there may be an association between periodontal disease and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, respiratory diseases, arthritis,  and diabetes, among others. Scientists believe that inflammation may be the cause behind the link between periodontal disease and other chronic conditions. Inflammation, the body’s reaction to fight off infection, guard against injury, or shield against irritation, initially intends to have a protective effect. Untreated chronic inflammation, on the other hand, can lead to the destruction of affected tissues, which can lead to more serious health conditions.     Relationship between periodontal disease and systemic conditions     Cardiovascular Disease Cardiovascular disease (CVD)  is one of the leading killers of men and women each year. Research has shown that inflammation is a major risk factor for developing CVD, and that people with periodontal disease may have an increased risk for CVD. Though more research is needed to better understand the connection between periodontal disease and CVD, don’t be surprised if your periodontist asks you about your heart health or if your cardiologist or physician asks you about your periodontal health.   Diabetes Periodontal disease can be a complication of diabetes. Researchers have found that people with poorly controlled Type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop periodontal disease. However, the risk isn’t just one way; people with periodontal disease may find it more difficult to control their blood sugar levels, which can increase the risk for diabetic complications. If you are living with diabetes, it is crucial that you pay close attention to your periodontal health.   Pregnancy Complications Studies have shown that women with periodontal disease may be at an increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as delivering a prefer or low birth weight baby. More research is needed to determine the exact relationship, but expectant mothers should consider having a periodontal evaluation to ensure that their periodontal health is at its best.   Respiratory Diseases Research has suggested that bacteria found in the mouth can be drawn into the respiratory tract and cause an inflammatory response in the lungs, commonly known as pneumonia. In addition, periodontal disease may also worsen existing chronic lung conditions. Anyone with lung or respiratory problems should consider a complete oral health examination to determine if gum disease is present. Alzheimer’s Disease Bacteria linked to gum disease traveled to the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease, suggesting that dental hygiene plays a role in the development of the memory-robbing illness. Since periodontal disease has been shown to have a connection with other chronic diseases, you should try to keep your teeth and gums healthy. First, be sure to brush your teeth at least twice each day and floss your teeth at least once each day. Additionally, you should receive a comprehensive periodontal exam each year from your general dentist or your periodontist. Doing so can help ensure that your periodontal health is at its best, which can help keep your entire body healthy.        DENTAL IMPLANTS:   A dental implant, usually made of titanium, is an artificial tooth root that is placed into your jaw to hold a replacement tooth or bridge. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but only one – dental implants – provide the feel, function and appearance of natural teeth. Dental implants may be an option for people who have lost a tooth or teeth due to periodontal disease, an injury, or some other reason.   Teeth restored with dental implants can’t get cavities! But you still need to brush, floss and provide good oral hygiene the same manner as you do with your natural teeth. Regular professional cleanings and check-ups are also essential for the long term maintenance of your implants.   Dental Implants have been used for many decades and have been proven to be safe and effective.   Are you a candidate for having implants?   The ideal candidate for a dental implant is in good general and oral health. Adequate bone in your jaw is needed to support the implant, and the best candidates have healthy gum tissues that are free of periodontal disease. A radiographic and clinical examination is most of the time enough to determine if you are a candidate for implants. Sometimes the surgeon needs to order a CT scan to make a proper diagnosis and to better select the location and size of your implants. Our dentists at Dental Associates will meet with you and discuss all your treatment needs and will help you to choose what is the best treatment to replace your missing teeth. This procedure is a team effort between you, your general dentist and your periodontist or oral surgeon. At Dental Associates, under one roof, our dental team will consult with you to determine where and how your implant should be placed. Depending on your specific condition we will create a treatment plan tailored to meet your needs.   How will the implants be placed? First, implants, which looks like screws, are placed into your jaw. Over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors. During this time, a temporary tooth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites. Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions called healing abutments. Your gums will be allowed to heal for few weeks following this procedure. The next step will be for you to see your general dentist for an impression. The lab will then based on the mold of your implant and adjacent teeth fabricate an abutment that will be the foundation on which your new tooth will be cemented. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and in your ability to chew and speak. Dental implants are so natural-looking and feeling, you may forget you ever lost a tooth. It is important to know that every case is different, and some of these steps can be combined when conditions permit. At dental associates, your dental professional team will  work with you to determine the best treatment plan.

Single Tooth Dental Implants

If you are missing a single tooth, one implant and a crown can replace it. A dental implant replaces both the lost natural tooth and its root. What are the advantages of a single-tooth implant over a bridge? A dental implant provides several advantages over other tooth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like a natural tooth, a dental implant replaces a single tooth without sacrificing the health of neighboring teeth. The other common treatment for the loss of a single tooth, a tooth-supported fixed bridge, requires that adjacent teeth be ground down to support the cemented bridge. Because a dental implant will replace your tooth root, the bone is better preserved. With a bridge, some of the bone that previously surrounded the tooth begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact. In the long-term, a single implant can be more esthetic and easier to keep clean than a bridge. Gums can recede around a bridge, leaving a visible defect when the metal base or collar of the bridge becomes exposed. Resorbed bone beneath the bridge can lead to an unattractive smile. And, the cement holding the bridge in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay the teeth that anchor the bridge.

Multiple Teeth Implants

If you are missing several teeth, implant-supported bridges can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots. What are the advantages of implant-supported bridges over fixed bridges or removable partial dentures? Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported bridges replace teeth without support from adjacent natural teeth. Other common treatments for the loss of several teeth, such as fixed bridges or removable partial dentures, are dependent on support from adjacent teeth. In addition, because implant-supported bridges will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth root may begin to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact. In the long term, implants are esthetic, functional and comfortable. Gums and bone can recede around a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, leaving a visible defect. Resorbed bone beneath bridges or removable partial dentures can lead to a collapsed, unattractive smile. The cement holding bridges in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay teeth that anchor the bridge. In addition, removable partial dentures can move around in the mouth and reduce your ability to eat certain foods.

 Full Mouth Dental Implants

If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported full bridge or full denture can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots. What are the advantages of implant-supported full bridges and implant-supported dentures over conventional dentures? Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported full bridges or dentures are designed to be long-lasting. Implant-supported full bridges and dentures also are more comfortable and stable than conventional dentures, allowing you to retain a more natural biting and chewing capacity. In addition, because implant-supported full bridges and dentures will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With conventional dentures, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth roots begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact. In the long-term, implants can be more esthetic and easier to maintain than conventional dentures. The loss of bone that accompanies conventional dentures leads to recession of the jawbone and a collapsed, unattractive smile. Conventional dentures can also make it difficult to eat certain foods. At Dental Associates our team will determine what is the best option to replace your teeth and we will give you the ability to chew better and smile with confidence.

Sinus Lift Surgery

A key to implant success is the quantity and quality of the bone where the implant is to be placed. The upper back jaw has traditionally been one of the most difficult areas to successfully place dental implants due to insufficient bone quantity and quality and the close proximity to the sinus. If you’ve lost bone in that area due to reasons such as periodontal disease or tooth loss, you may be left without enough bone to place implants. Sinus lift surgery can help correct this problem by raising the sinus floor and developing bone for the placement of dental implants. Several techniques can be used to raise the sinus and allow for new bone to form. In one common technique, an incision is made to expose the bone. Then a small circle is cut into the bone. This bony piece is lifted into the sinus cavity, much like a trap door, and the space underneath is filled with bone graft material. Our surgeons can explain your options for graft materials, which can regenerate lost bone and tissue. Finally, the incision is closed and healing is allowed to take place. Depending on your individual needs, the bone usually will be allowed to develop for about four to 12 months before implants can be placed. After the implants are placed, an additional healing period is required. In many cases, the implant can be placed at the same time the sinus is augmented. Undergoing sinus lift surgery has been shown to greatly increase your chances for successful implants that can last for years to come. Many patients experience minimal discomfort during this procedure. At Dental Associates our team is prepared to diagnose your problem and provide you with a best treatment plan that will meet your functional and esthetic needs.        

Dental Implants

A dental implant, usually made of titanium, is an artificial tooth root that is placed into your jaw to hold a replacement tooth or bridge. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but only one – dental implants – provide the feel, function and appearance of natural teeth. Dental implants may be an option for people who have lost a tooth or teeth due to periodontal disease, an injury, or some other reason.

Teeth restored with dental implants can’t get cavities! But you still need to brush, floss and provide good oral hygiene the same manner as you do with your natural teeth. Regular professional cleanings and check-ups are also essential for the long-term maintenance of your implants.

Dental Implants have been used for many decades and have been proven to be safe and effective.

Are you a candidate for having implants?

 

The ideal candidate for a dental implant is in good general and oral health. Adequate bone in your jaw is needed to support the implant, and the best candidates have healthy gum tissues that are free of periodontal disease. A radiographic and clinical examination is most of the time enough to determine if you are a candidate for implants. Sometimes the surgeon needs to order a CT scan to make a proper diagnosis and to better select the location and size of your implants. Our dentists at Dental Associates will meet with you and discuss all your treatment needs and will help you to choose what is the best treatment to replace your missing teeth.

This procedure is a team effort between you, your general dentist and your periodontist or oral surgeon. At Dental Associates, under one roof, our dental team will consult with you to determine where and how your implant should be placed. Depending on your specific condition we will create a treatment plan tailored to meet your needs.

 

How will the implants be placed?

First, implants, which looks like screws, are placed into your jaw. Over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors. During this time, a temporary tooth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions called healing abutments. Your gums will be allowed to heal for few weeks following this procedure. The next step will be for you to see your general dentist for an impression. The lab will then based on the mold of your implant and adjacent teeth fabricate an abutment that will be the foundation on which your new tooth will be cemented.

After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and in your ability to chew and speak. Dental implants are so natural-looking and feeling, you may forget you ever lost a tooth.

It is important to know that every case is different, and some of these steps can be combined when conditions permit. At dental associates, your dental professional team will  work with you to determine the best treatment plan.

 

Single Tooth Dental Implants

If you are missing a single tooth, one implant and a crown can replace it. A dental implant replaces both the lost natural tooth and its root.

What are the advantages of a single-tooth implant over a bridge?
A dental implant provides several advantages over other tooth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like a natural tooth, a dental implant replaces a single tooth without sacrificing the health of neighboring teeth. The other common treatment for the loss of a single tooth, a tooth-supported fixed bridge, requires that adjacent teeth be ground down to support the cemented bridge.

Because a dental implant will replace your tooth root, the bone is better preserved. With a bridge, some of the bone that previously surrounded the tooth begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long-term, a single implant can be more esthetic and easier to keep clean than a bridge. Gums can recede around a bridge, leaving a visible defect when the metal base or collar of the bridge becomes exposed. Resorbed bone beneath the bridge can lead to an unattractive smile. And, the cement holding the bridge in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay the teeth that anchor the bridge.

Multiple Teeth Implants

If you are missing several teeth, implant-supported bridges can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

What are the advantages of implant-supported bridges over fixed bridges or removable partial dentures?
Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported bridges replace teeth without support from adjacent natural teeth. Other common treatments for the loss of several teeth, such as fixed bridges or removable partial dentures, are dependent on support from adjacent teeth.

In addition, because implant-supported bridges will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth root may begin to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact. In the long-term, implants are esthetic, functional and comfortable. Gums and bone can recede around a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, leaving a visible defect. Resorbed bone beneath bridges or removable partial dentures can lead to a collapsed, unattractive smile. The cement holding bridges in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay teeth that anchor the bridge. In addition, removable partial dentures can move around in the mouth and reduce your ability to eat certain foods.

 Full Mouth Dental Implants

If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported full bridge or full denture can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

What are the advantages of implant-supported full bridges and implant-supported dentures over conventional dentures?
Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported full bridges or dentures are designed to be long-lasting. Implant-supported full bridges and dentures also are more comfortable and stable than conventional dentures, allowing you to retain a more natural biting and chewing capacity.

In addition, because implant-supported full bridges and dentures will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With conventional dentures, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth roots begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long-term, implants can be more esthetic and easier to maintain than conventional dentures. The loss of bone that accompanies conventional dentures leads to recession of the jawbone and a collapsed, unattractive smile. Conventional dentures can also make it difficult to eat certain foods.

At Dental Associates our team will determine what is the best option to replace your teeth and we will give you the ability to chew better and smile with confidence.

Sinus Lift Surgery

A key to implant success is the quantity and quality of the bone where the implant is to be placed. The upper back jaw has traditionally been one of the most difficult areas to successfully place dental implants due to insufficient bone quantity and quality and the close proximity to the sinus. If you’ve lost bone in that area due to reasons such as periodontal disease or tooth loss, you may be left without enough bone to place implants.

Sinus lift surgery can help correct this problem by raising the sinus floor and developing bone for the placement of dental implants. Several techniques can be used to raise the sinus and allow for new bone to form. In one common technique, an incision is made to expose the bone. Then a small circle is cut into the bone. This bony piece is lifted into the sinus cavity, much like a trap door, and the space underneath is filled with bone graft material. Our surgeons can explain your options for graft materials, which can regenerate lost bone and tissue.

Finally, the incision is closed and healing is allowed to take place. Depending on your individual needs, the bone usually will be allowed to develop for about 6  to 12 months before implants can be placed. After the implants are placed, an additional healing period is required.

In many cases, the implant can also be placed at the same time the sinus is augmented.

Undergoing sinus lift surgery has been shown to greatly increase your chances for successful implants that can last for years to come. Many patients experience minimal discomfort during this procedure.

At Dental Associates our team is prepared to diagnose your problem and provide you with a best treatment plan that will meet your functional and esthetic needs.